Monday, January 15, 2018

Teachers Learn Best from Other Teachers

Ed kicking off EdCampWalpole - Family Feud Style!
It's TRUE! Teachers learn best from other teachers.  Perhaps that is why EdCamps are so popular! They are so popular that  our district has dedicated a whole professional development day modeled after the Edcamp style. (Not familiar with Edcamp - read about it HERE.) 

Paula B. sharing Osmos to Kindergarten Teachers
This is the 3rd year our district has participated in a "modified" Edcamp.  Each year the call goes out to all educators in the system to submit a topic to either "lead", "facilitate" or "explore".  This year more and more teachers shared their craft and experiences with colleagues.  We even had some out of district teachers present. (And a keynote presentation by Alan November!)

It's TRUE! Teachers learn best from other teachers!  Why? Because teachers are passionate!  When teachers are passionate about what pedagogy, it's hard not to get excited right alongside them.  
Sheila R. sharing the power of SPLAT!

Several of the teachers from the two buildings where I work decided to go out of their comfort zone and share their passions with the rest of the district.  These teachers believe in what they are doing with their students.  

These are teachers who share their expertise with their elementary students on a daily basis, but who aren't usually in front of their colleagues. However, their passion helped them come forward, take a chance and present new and relevant information. 
Suzanne G. sharing Flexible Seating in the classroom

It's TRUE! Teachers learn best from other teachers!  Why? Because teachers are sharing real world experiences.  The teachers are sharing what has worked in their very own classrooms (or  how they revised what might not have worked).  

Erica, Laurie & Diane sharing Google Sites
Teachers from my schools shared how they are using tools to communicate with parents through the use of Seesaw or through the use of a website built using Google Sites. These are teachers are fairly new to presenting. Other teachers shared ideas for various Math topics and another on Flexible Seating.  So proud of their hard work and efforts!

It's TRUE! Teachers learn best from other teachers!  Why? Because teachers know they can relate to and reach out to a colleague if they have a question.  

Discussing Standards Based Report Cards
   All who presented shared their contact information and offered to come and help participants if ever assistance was needed. Even after the the allotted time was up conversations continued where further information was given.  

Carolyn K. sharing 3 Act Math Tasks
It was a great day had by all! Again, to the teachers that presented...I'm so proud that they took a chance and shared their expertise!  I encourage others to do so as well.  We all have gifts that we can and need to impart with our colleagues and other educators across the globe! (Thank you also to all those behind the scenes organizers who made the day successful too!) 

So, even if you are not going to an Edcamp or some other professional development day, think about communicating your ideas with your colleague next door, down the hall, across town or share via Twitter or Facebook.  We love learning from YOU! 

In the comments section, feel free to share a topic you'd like to learn more about or even a topic you shared at a conference or workshop! Thank you.

2 comments:

  1. Yeah, They can also learn from their students.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Absolutely! That's been the topic of several other posts. My intention behind the post was that we don't need to search far & wide for PD presenters. Thank you for helping me clarify!

      Delete

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